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Archive for the ‘Riverside’ Category

Screenshot (9)Argus Street is a short street in the Riverside Neighborhood of Buffalo.  The street runs two blocks, between Esser Avenue and Vulcan Street.  The street is named after Francis (Frank) X Argus, one of the original owners of the land that is now Riverside Park.

spring

Jubilee Water Works at Delaware and Auburn.  Source:  Picture Book of Earlier Buffalo

George Argus, Frank’s father, came to Black Rock from Bavaria.  George worked as a teacher in a parochial school and then went into the grocery business.  Frank was born in Black Rock in 1854.  Frank Argus was a commissioner of the old Jubilee Reservoir at the corner of Delaware Avenue and Auburn Avenue.  It was located on the west side of the street between Auburn and Lancaster Avenues.  The Jubilee Spring is the spring that gives the Cold Spring neighborhood it’s name – the spring ran through the basement of the Cold Spring tavern on Main Street at Ferry.  The spring also feeds the lake at Forest Lawn Cemetery.  The Jubilee Water Works was incorporated in 1827 by John G. Camp, Reuben Heacock, and Frederick Merrill to supply Buffalo and Black Rock with water.  They built a system to serve Black Rock and began to expand to serve parts of Buffalo, but the Jubilee Springs could not provide enough water to keep up with the demand, so the system could not expand further.  When Black Rock was annexed by the City of Buffalo in 1853, the City of Buffalo acquired the system, which was abandoned by 1890.  

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Jubilee Library.  Photo by Author

After the reservoir was abandoned, the site was purchased by Albert F. Laub.  Mr. Argus insisted that the property not be sold unless it was agreed that the funds used for the sale would be used to build a branch library. The Water Works property was sold in 1899, but it took years before the proceeds were released and a new location was selected. The Jubilee Branch library opened on December 20, 1915 at 1930 Niagara Street. The Jubilee Library was the first non-rented library space in Buffalo. It was designed to have a children’s side, an adult side and an auditorium in the basement. The site was constructed next door to a city-owned community center that also had a gym, creating a cohesive community oriented space. the site was selected by the City and there were concerns about the safety of children crossing the railroad tracks to get to the library, as well as its location along the water rather than in a neighborhood. The continued development of Black Rock proved that the Jubilee Branch was well suited to serve the community. It was particularly used by nearby industrial businesses for technical reference material. The success of the Jubilee Branch Library encouraged the library to pursue creating additional library branches built to be libraries, rather than using available existing spaces which they rented.

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1916-1918 Niagara Street.  Photo by Author

Mr. Argus married Mary Heims.  They had two sons and two daughters- Francis, Clarence,  Maud Argus Haley and Olive Argus Walsh. The family lived at 1916 Niagara Street (corner of Hamilton). For 40 years, Mr. Argus operated a hardware store in the same building where they lived. The store’s address was 1918 Niagara Street. The store sold hardware, cutlery and stoves. The building appears to still be standing today, and the store appears to be converted into apartments. The building would have had the Erie Canal flowing through it’s backyard, but now abuts the I-190. The children oriented towards medicine – Dr. Francis Argus became a nose and throat specialist after serving as a major in the Army Medical Corps during WWI, Dr. Clarence Argus became a dentist, and the daughters both married doctors.  The daughters were graduates of Holy Angels Academy and accomplished pianists/organists.  

When Mr. Argus, Mr. Esser and Mr. Hertel sold the Riverside Park property to the city, Mr. Argus insisted that the riparian rights allowing the building of a dock were relinquished to the city.  This ensured that the public had access to the water. Mr. Argus was a boater and a charter member of the Buffalo Launch Club.  He was also a member of the Knights of Columbus.

After retirement, Mr. Argus traveled throughout the United States.  He spent winters in Florida, California or Cuba.  He enjoyed returning for summers in Buffalo.  He lived with his son in a house at 237 Lafayette Avenue. The house was known around town for Frank’s beautiful garden, which son Clarence continued after his father’s death.  While Frank was gardening long before Garden Walk existed, Buffalonians still take pride in our gardens today – perhaps you even may have seen a house near Frank’s former house this weekend on Garden Walk?  

Want to learn about other streets?  Check out the Street Index.  Don’t forget to subscribe to the page to be notified when new posts are made.  You can do so by entering your email address in the box on the upper right hand side of the home page.  You can also follow the blog on facebook.  If you enjoy the blog, please be sure to share it with your friends.

Sources:  

  • “An Act to provide a mode for ultimate disposition of property belonging to the Jubilee water system in the City of Buffalo and investment of the proceeds.”  Laws of the State of New York Passed at the One Hundred and Thirteenth Session.  Chapter 154. Banks & Brothers Publishers, Albany, 1890.
  • Pierce, Morris.  “Documentary History of American Water-Works:  Buffalo, New York”.  http://www.waterworkshistory.us/ 
  • Severance, Frank Ed.  Picture Book of Earlier Buffalo.  Buffalo Historical Society. 1912. 
  • Smith, H. Katherine.  “Argus Street Reminds of Founder of Jubilee Library”.  Buffalo Courier Express.  June 21, 1941.

 

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Sheridan Drive

Sheridan Drive

There are actually two roads named Sheridan in Buffalo.  The first is Sheridan Drive, a road that most Western New Yorkers are probably familiar with.  Sheridan Drive runs from the Niagara River and River Road east into the Town of Tonawanda, the Town of Amherst and into the Town of Clarence, where it ends at an intersection with Main Street.  The western end of Sheridan Drive is assigned NY Route 325 from Niagara Street to Grand Island Boulevard.  East of Grand Island Boulevard, Sheridan Drive is designated as NY Route 324.

Sheridan Terrace

Sheridan Terrace

The second Sheridan is Sheridan Terrace.  Much of Sheridan Terrace no longer exists due to construction of the I-190 and the Peace Bridge entrance ramps. Sheridan Terrace had been a Frederick Law Olmsted designed road that led from “The Bank” (a circle located at Massachusetts Street, Sixth Street – now Busti Ave – and Niagara Street) across the front of Fort Porter into Front Park. The portion of Sheridan Terrace that remains functions as the exit ramp from the I-190 to Busti Avenue.

Unfinished monument in Sheridan Drive, 1925 (still looks the same today)

Unfinished monument in Sheridan Drive, 1925 (still looks the same today)

Sheridan Drive and Sheridan Terrace are named after General Philip Henry Sheridan.  Tonawanda historians claim that Sheridan Drive was named after Sheridan Road in Chicago and not General Sheridan; however, the road in Chicago was also named after General Sheridan.  In 1925, when Sheridan Drive was opened, a monument was built on Sheridan Drive near Delaware Avenue.  The monument had intended to have a statue of General Sheridan, but taxpayers felt that too much money had been spent on what they felt was an “unnecessarily fancy highway through rural lands”.  A completed statue of General Sheridan stands on the steps of the Capitol Building in Albany.

Sheridan Monument in Albany, New York

Sheridan Monument in Albany, New York

Philip Henry Sheridan was born in march 1831.  He claimed to be born in Albany, New York.  His parents were immigrants from Ireland.  Some skeptics claimed Mr. Sheridan may have been born on the ship coming from Ireland, and that he said he was born in Albany in order to claim natural-born citizenship to be eligible for presidency.  As a boy, he worked at general stores.  In 1848, one of his customers, Congressman Thomas Ritchey, appointed him for the US Military Academy.  He graduated in 1853.

Mr. Sheridan became a United States Army officer and Union General during the Civil War.  He defeated confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley, one of the first uses of scorched earth tactics during the war.  The troops were instructed to do damage to the railroads and crops, to leave the valley a barren wasteland to prevent the confederacy from using it as a productive crop land.

Sheridan's Ride at Cedar Creek, from the Library of Congress

Sheridan’s Ride at Cedar Creek, from the Library of Congress

In 1865, his Calvary was instrumental in forcing the surrender of General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox, which occurred in April of 1865.  General Sheridan and his troops helped to block Lee’s escape.  “Sheridan’s Ride” became the subject of songs and poems, talking of Sheridan’s valiant efforts.  Ulysses S. Grant said of Sheridan, “I believe General Sheridan has no superior as a general, either living or dead, and perhaps not an equal.”

Sheridan's Camp at Yellowstone

Sheridan’s Camp at Yellowstone

Sheridan was an advocate for the protection of the Yellowstone area.  He fought against a plan to develop 4,000 acres in the park, lobbing congress to protect the park.  Sheridan’s efforts expanded the park, established military control of the park, and reduced the development to only 10 acres.  Mount Sheridan was named in his honor.

General Sheridan died in August 1888 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, on a hillside facing Washington DC.  His wife, who was 20 years younger than him, never remarried and was said to have stated that “I would rather be the widow of Phil Sheridan than the wife of any other living man”.

Sheridan's Grave

Sheridan’s Grave

 Learn about other streets in the Street Index.

 Sources:

  1. Martin, Susan. “Road Test – Sheridan Drive?  Porter Ave?  Who are all these streets and highways named after anyway?”  Buffalo News, July 7, 2002, p. E-1
  2. Percy, John.  “Named After Chicago Street”.  Letter to Editor.  Buffalo News, July 15, 2002.
  3. Morrison, Jed.  “Sheridan’s Ride”.  New York Times, October 14, 2014.
  4. Grossman, Ron. “Why It’s Called Sheridan Road – Or How The General Saved Chicago”. Chicago Tribune, December 11, 2014.

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Hertel Avenue is a major east-west thoroughfare in North Buffalo running from Main Street to the Niagara River. The street was previously known as Cornelius Creek Road, named after the creek, which ran near the street. Hertel Avenue was named for John Stephen Hertel, former County Supervisor.

Hertel Avenue and others Named After Black Rock Land Company Associates

Hertel Avenue and other streets named after Black Rock Land Company associates

Mr. Hertel was one of three owners of the land that is now Riverside Park and was a founder of the Black Rock Land Company, the first land development company in Buffalo. The Black Rock Land Company was founded in 1888 and consisted of John Hertel, John Esser, Frank Argus, Louis Roesch and Frederick Ullman. You’ll notice that several other streets in the Black Rock/Riverside neighborhoods are named after these men.

John Stephen Hertel came to Black Rock with his parents at the age of two, immigrating from Edesheim Germany. Mr. Hertel attended St. Francis School and learned the cooper trade, making barrels for brewers and distillers. He then became involved in the hotel business. He opened a hotel at the corner of what would become Hertel Avenue and Niagara Street. Before the 1890s, the Riverside area was primarily rural countryside. At the time, the street that would become Hertel Avenue only extended from Niagara Street to Military Road. When the Niagara Horse Car Line was extended to Hertel Avenue, the legend says that Mr. Hertel was so excited, he ran out of the hotel without a coat to be the first to ride on the first horse-car to pass the hotel.

John S. Hertel, 1899

John S. Hertel, 1899

Mr. Hertel was also the director of the Erie Fire Insurance Company and had extensive real estate holdings. The Black Rock Land Company was formed in 1888 and was one of the first development companyies in the City of Buffalo. The Land Company included Mr. Hertel, Mr. Esser, Mr. Argus, Mr. Roesch and Mr. Ullman. Mr. Hertel’s property included most of the land occupied by Peoria Street and Hartman Place. He subdivided the streets and named the latter for the family of his wife, the former Anna S. Hartman of Rochester. The hotel was successful for Mr. Hertel. He then went into business with John J. Esser and Frank Argus to purchase what was known as Germania Park, which at the time was a private picnic grounds with a boat launch. They built a hotel at Germania Park. The City of Buffalo offered to purchase their property.  The City of Buffalo used this site to create Riverside Park.

Rvierside Park, about 1910

Riverside Park, about 1910

At the time, there was great support for the City to buy Germania Park, to give the public a place to enjoy the river “where any resident of Buffalo could go with his whole family and be free from beer saloons and drunken men”. Riverside Park was the final park designed for Buffalo by the Olmsted Architecture Firm, following Frederick Law Olmsted’s retirement. The park was designed in 1898, at the time the Erie Canal traversed the park, separating the shoreline from the main part of the park. The original 22-acre park included a boat dock and canal overpass. The New York State Thruway I-190 currently runs along the Erie Canal alignment. The park was expanded in 1912 to include an additional 17 acres on the south side of the park. The original southern boundary was a line extending from Esser Avenue to the Niagara River.

After selling Germania Park, Mr. Hertel and Mr. Esser left the hotel business. They entered into the coal and wood business, establishing the business near the corner of Niagara and Farmer Streets. They also established the Tonawanda Street Planing Mill at Tonawanda and Arthur Streets.

John Hertel and his wife Anna lived with their family at 362 Dearborn Street. The Hertel family lived in the house for several generations, his son John Stephen Hertel II, his daughter Mrs. Franscis Healy and his grandson John Hertel Healy all lived in the Dearborn house.

hertel grave

John Stephen Hertel was a life long democrat and was active in local politics. He was unsuccessful in a campaign for congress. For 27 years, he was a lieutenant colonel of the Knights of St. John. He was a member of St. Mary’s Commandery and an organizer of the commendary at St. Francis Church.  St. Francis Church is now the Buffalo Religious Arts Center. He was active in the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Men’s Benevolent Association, the Foresters of America and the Black Rock Businessmen’s Association. He died in 1917 and is buried at the United German and French Cemetery in Cheektowaga

To learn about other streets, check out the Street Index.

Sources:

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Doyle Avenue is a street in the Riverside Neighborhood in Buffalo.  The street runs 0.25 miles between Kenmore Avenue and Skillen Street.

Doyle Avenue is named for Major General Peter Cozzens Doyle.  Maj. Doyle was born in Washington County in 1842.  He came to Buffalo with his family via the Erie Canal when he was 4.  He lived in Buffalo until his death.  He attended Public School No. 2 and Old Central High School, but his formal education ended in his teens as was custom in the time, due to the need to earn a living.  He became a telegrapher and became an operator for the Lake Shore Railroad before he was 16.  At 16, he became a bookkeeper for the Buffalo Courier, and worked for the paper from 1858 until the outbreak of the Civil War.  He enlisted and became a lieutenant.  His knowledge of telegraphy was valuable to the army signal corps.  Following the war, he returned to the Courier.  He was associated with the railroads and local wholesale grocers.

Maj. Doyle was elected to his first public office in 1869, when he was elected superintendent of the Buffalo Fire Department.  At the time, firemen were all volunteers, and Superintendent Doyle was a pioneer in advocating the use of horses to draw hose carts and hook and ladder apparatus.  At the time, volunteer firemen and any other men or boys who were nearby would hitch up to the apparatus and run to the scene of action.

In 1870, Doyle became Chief of Police.  During this time, he purchased the right of way for the Buffalo and Jamestown Railroad.  He would drive his buggy along the right of way and buy the land, parcel by parcel.  He became first superintendent of that railroad.

In 1881, Doyle was chairman of the Democratic Committee of Erie County.  That year, they were having a hard time finding a candidate for Mayor, as many democratic candidates had been defeated in previous elections and they found running to be a hopeless cause.   Five people had been asked to run for office, all turning down the offer.  Doyle was instrumental in convincing prominent Buffalo attorney and former Erie County Sheriff Grover Cleveland to run for Mayor.  The rest is political history, as Cleveland rose from Mayor to Governor to President by 1885.

Maj. Doyle was also the Buffalo representative for the Lehigh Valley Railroad and Coal Company, president of the Local Merchants Exchange and a vestryman of Trinity Episcopal Church.

Maj. Doyle married Annie Kelderhouse (her uncle William Mowry operated the first cotton mill in New YorK State).  Annie and Peter built a brick home at Niagara and Georgia Streets.  Later, they built another house on Mariner Street.  Although he owned a great deal of real estate throughout the City, he owned no land near what would eventually became Doyle Avenue.  However, his brother-in-law, John Kelderhouse owned land in that area, which was instrumental in the choice of the name Doyle Avenue.  Maj. Doyle and his wife had three daughters and two sons.  Sadly, the sons died of diphtheria in their teens, only a year before the discovery of the antitoxin.

During the Spanish-American War Maj. Doyle commanded the troops at Peeksill.  At the war’s close in 1901, he was made Major General.  He died later that same year and is buried in Forest Lawn.

To learn about other streets in Buffalo, check out the Street Index.

Source: “Doyle Avenue Honors Soldier- Civic Leader” Courier Express, Jan 1 1939, sec. 5, p.2

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