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Archive for February, 2015

griderGrider Street is located on the East Side of Buffalo, running north-south between Leroy Street and East Delavan Avenue.  The street is one of the main thoroughfares through the Delavan-Grider neighborhood. The Erie County Medical Center (ECMC) is located on Grider Street.

Daniel Grider (also spelled Greider) was born in Pennsylvania in 1787.  He came to Buffalo in a covered wagon drawn by oxen in the early 1820s.

Daniel Grider's great-granddaughter.  Courier-Express, February 4, 1940

Daniel Grider’s great-granddaughter with the family cornerstone. Courier-Express, February 4, 1940

Daniel Grider bought a 48-acre farm for 50 cents an acre.  He built a frame house opposite the site of the Buffalo City Hospital (now ECMC).   Mr. Grider’s family spoke German in his youth.  One way that Daniel would save money was to hire newly arrived German immigrants to work on his farm in Buffalo, giving them food and board and teaching them English.  By 1835, he had prospered and built a larger, more substantial house in its place.

Mr. Grider and his wife Nancy, had two daughters, Fanny and Nancy.  He was well respected in Buffalo, but never ran for public office.  Mr. Grider served as a representative from Erie County for the Canal Convention regarding upgrades to the Erie Canal in 1837.

The Grider farm was subdivided when the Erie and Lackawanna railroads passed through Buffalo.  At that time, the farm was cut into building lots and streets were laid out.

Mr. Grider passed way on March 25, 1855.  The family operated a burial plot on the Grider farm.  When the property was sold, the family members’ graves were moved to Mount Hope Cemetery at Pine Ridge.

Learn about other streets by checking out the Street Index.

Source:  “Grider street Recalls Name of Land Owner”  Courier Express Feb 4 1940 Sec 5 p 4

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aldrichAldrich Place is a short street in South Buffalo between South Park Avenue and McKinley Parkway near the Buffalo-Lackawanna border.  The street is named after a man who was one of the first settlers in that part of South Buffalo.

Alexander Aldrich came to Buffalo from England as a young man with his wife, Lucinda.  In 1855, Mr. Aldrich purchased a 50-acre farm that included the land that is now Aldrich Place.  His farm stretched from the present day South Park Avenue to McKinley Parkway, south to the railroad lines and north to Downing Street.  His farm mainly raised celery, black walnuts and flowers.  At the time, this section of South Buffalo was famous for its celery.  He built a greenhouse for the flowers on the South Park Avenue side of his property, selling to people on their way to Holy Cross Cemetery.

In those days, the Aldrich farm was located in a sparsely populated neighborhood.  Lucinda would tell stories of days when Native Americans would peer in the window.  They were curious about the light coming out of the windows and wanted to watch what a white family did at night.

During the Civil War, Alexander and Lucinda traveled to Washington, DC.  While there, Alexander had his photo taken with President Lincoln on the steps of the White House.  If any members of the Aldrich family are reading this, I’d love to see the photo if it still exists!!

Alexander and Lucinda had three sons – Henry, Wallace, and Albert – and a daughter, Sally, who became Mrs. Ace Reed.  Henry was a taxidermist.  Albert was in charge of most of the excavating and grading for the South Park Botanical Gardens.  To do this work, ten teams of horses were used; Albert hired his neighbors to assist in the work.

Alexander Aldrich's Grave

Alexander Aldrich’s Grave

Mr. Aldrich later sold his farm to the Pixley Land Company for development in 1903.  The Aldrich family house was moved to Downing Street and converted into apartments.

Alexander Aldrich died in 1897 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Orchard Park.

Alexander’s grandson, Robert Reed, was the first mayor of Lackawanna.

Check out the street index to learn about other streets!

 

Source:

Memorial to Farmer-florist.  Courier Express Se. 1, 1940, sec 6 p3

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