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Posts Tagged ‘Getzville’

Today, we are going to discuss an area that is significant in my life. I grew up in Snyder on the grounds of what was once the Hedstrom Estate. Many of the early leaders of Buffalo Industry had country estates like this. Today, Amherst is the most populous town in New York State outside of the New York City metropolitan area. It’s hard to think about it being the location of a country estate. The growth of Amherst began around 1893 when the Buffalo and Williamsville Railway opened. Several suburban estates and horse farms popped up along this route. The area appealed to those who wanted to get out of the congestion and density of the city. The rail route and the easy proximity to the City of Buffalo made this a prime place for development while still commuting into the city. The Hedstroms were among others who built their estates in Amherst – another one was the Sattlers, who were neighbors to the Hedstroms. As automobiles became more common around the 1920s, subdivisions developed in this part of Amherst (Snyder/Eggertsville). While the estates have been subdivided, several of the historic homes still stand, such as the Hedstrom and Sattler’s homes.

roads3Let’s get ourselves oriented for today’s post. We’ll be discussing several streets. Firstly, Getzville Road, shown in yellow on the map, runs approximately 1.25 miles from Main Street to just past Sheridan Drive. Hedstrom Drive, shown in red, runs about 0.5 miles from Copper Heights to a dead end. Three other streets end in culs-de-sac with no outlet – Elmhurst Road, shown in light blue; High Court, shown in purple; and Four Winds Way, shown in orange. The Hedstrom’s country estate we’ll be discussing is shown in blue, based off of a 1915 map (boundaries may have changed over time). The Manor House is displayed with the green star, and the Gate House is shown with the yellow star.   

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Approximate route of Getzville Road (New Home Road) in 1866 shown in orange. Current Getzville Road shown in red.

The road that would become Getzville Road appears on maps as early as 1829. It grew over time, and by 1855, the road reached out to where Sheridan Drive is now. By 1866, the road reached North Forest Road. It eventually continued northward to Ellicott Creek Road. The road was initially known as New Home Road. As this was the road from Snyder to the Getzville, the road was then named after Joseph Goetz. Mr. Goetz was the first postmaster of Getzville, centered around what is now the intersection of Campbell Boulevard and Dodge Road. By 1939, a portion of the road was changed to Buffalo-Millersport Road (now Millersport Highway). In 1948, the portion leading north past Ellicott Creek became Campbell Boulevard. Getzville Road was shortened to its current length when the Youngmann Expressway (I-290) was built. One of Getzville’s distinctive features is the old stone wall that forms the border along the northwest corner of Main Street. In 1987, my family moved onto Getzville Road (a fact that is likely only important to me, haha)

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Source Mitchell Hedstrom: Five Generations of Hedstroms

Hedstrom Drive is named for Arthur Hedstrom, an early settler at Main and Getzville Road. The Hedstroms, Arthur’s grandparents Erik and Charlotte, came to America around 1843 from Sweden with their son Erik. Erik was called by his middle name, Leonard, and was 7 when they came to America. He decided he did not want to be a farmer like his father, so he went into the blacksmith trade. At age 21, Leonard took a position with AB Meeker, a Chicago-based coal operator, and pig iron merchant.

Around 1864, Leonard came to Buffalo to open a branch of the A.B. Meeker coal business here. Erik and Charlotte followed their son to Buffalo around that time. Leonard attended the Cedar Street Baptist Church, where he met Anna Matilda Clampffer. Leonard and Anna were married in 1865 and moved into a house on Michigan Street between Seneca and Swan Streets. Their daughter Alice was born in April 1866, and a son Arthur Eric was born in August 1869. In 1882, Leonard built a house at 717 Delaware Avenue between North and Summer Streets. Anna lived there until the 1920s.  

Shortly after he set up the offices for A.B. Meeker, he set up his own company at the foot of Erie Street to receive coal from New York via the Canal. The company was called the E.L. Hedstrom Company. The company distributed anthracite coal across Western New York and in Chicago, the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Nebraska. The company was the largest shipper of coal on the Great Lakes. The company also did some coal mining and produced pig iron. In 1870, Leonard helped build the Buffalo Creek Railway. He served as President of the railway until it was taken over by the Lehigh Valley and Erie Companies in 1876. In 1871, Leonard built the first coal trestle in Buffalo at the Lehigh Docks to transfer anthracite coal from cars to vessels. Leonard also worked with the DL&W railroad to handle their coal destruction. The firm of E.L. Hedstrom was the only individual shipper of anthracite coal from Buffalo by the lake to the upper lake ports. The company had its offices at 304-312 Ellicott Square (note: this was before the construction of the Ellicott Square Building – the buildings prior were also called Ellicott Square. Based on City Directories, it does appear that the company did have offices in the Ellicott Square Building once it was built as well).

In 1880, Leonard began handling and distributing various grades of bituminous (or soft) coal – the first Pittsburgh Coal in the Buffalo Market. By 1880, the Chicago office was called Meeker, Hedstrom & Co, and by 1888, it was called E.L. Hedstrom & Co – with three partners – E.L. Hedstrom, G.W. Meeker, and J.H. Brown. The firm had three offices – Chicago, Buffalo, and Racine, Wisconsin (on Lake Michigan near Milwaukee).

Leonard was an active member of the Board of Trade and President of Buffalo Merchant’s Exchange. He was also a Director of the Buffalo Bank of Commerce and President of the Buffalo Baptist Union. Leonard served as President of the YMCA, a Director of the Buffalo Homeopathic Hospital, and the Homestead Lodging House. Anna was involved in the Home for the Friendless (which became Bristol Home and only recently closed earlier this year).

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Hedstrom Memorial Church, Doat Street Location (now Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church) Source: Mike Puma, Views of Buffalo 

Before he died, Leonard had contributed to the Delaware Avenue Baptist Church, which opened at 965 Delaware Avenue in January 1895, the year after Leonard died. The pipe organ, pulpit, and baptistry are all in memorial of Erik Leonard Hedstrom. The Hedstrom Memorial Baptist Church was also founded around the time of Leonard’s death. Anna Hedstrom donated $5,000 for the Baptist Mission at Walden Avenue to build a permanent home of worship in memory of her husband. A modest frame church was built at 106 Sumner Place. In 1897, the congregation formally became Hedstrom Memorial Baptist Church and dedicated their new place of worship. In 1931, they moved to 165 Doat Street. In 1989, they moved to Losson Road in Cheektowaga.

Anna and Leonard’s son Arthur attended Heathcote School for Boys in Buffalo, a small private school located at 310 Pearl Street. He also attended the Briggs School in Buffalo and the University of Rochester, from which he graduated in 1892. After Leonard died in 1894, Arthur took over the business as a partner in E.L. Hedstrom & Co. He also served as President of the Franklin Iron Manufacturing Company.

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Wilcox Mansion, where Albert and Katherine got married (and Teddy was inaugurated).  Photo by Author

Arthur married Katherine Meigs Wilcox on June 14, 1898. Katherine was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1875. She is the youngest of ten children; her big brother is Ansley Wilcox. Arthur and Katherine got married in the library at Ansley’s house. Just a few years later, the library was much more famously used for Theodore Roosevelt’s Inauguration. So the house is better known today as the TR Inaugural Site (note: I’m still pretty psyched to know that I’ve stood in the library where they were married, haha!)

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Source Mitchell Hedstrom: Five Generations of Hedstroms

Arthur and Katherine first lived at 27 Oakland Place. Their son, Eric Leonard, was born there in March 1899. They then moved to 498 Delaware Avenue, where their daughter Brenda was born in September 1902. A third son Lars was born in August 1909. The family was well known in the social circles of Buffalo. They were members of the Buffalo Club, the Saturn Club, the Buffalo Athletic Club, the Buffalo Country Club, and the Buffalo Tennis and Squash Club. Arthur was athletic. He had played first base for the University of Rochester baseball team. In addition, he played golf and tennis. He kept a list of all the golf courses he had played on, including 95 courses in the United States and 53 courses in other countries. He won the Buffalo Country Club Championship in 1896. He also played in the finals of the Buffalo City Championship in tennis singles for three years.

In 1904, Arthur and Katherine purchased 97 acres of land at 4200 Main Street. This was 9 miles from Downtown Buffalo. They built a home (referred to here as the Manor House) there in 1906. They developed the property into a country estate, including a tennis court, swimming pool, bathhouse, barn, formal gardens, and a pond. They originally intended the land to be a working farm, called Four Winds Farm, with four milk cows and two workhorses to plow the fields. However, after about ten years, they gave up the idea of running a farm.

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Source Mitchell Hedstrom: Five Generations of Hedstroms

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Arthur Hedstrom’s tadem horses he’d use to commute. Photo Source Mitchell Hedstrom: Five Generations of Hedstroms

Eric, Brenda, and Lars grew up on Four Winds Farm. The family commuted into the city often. Arthur would drive to work, first by horse and later in a maroon Pierce-Arrow limousine driven by his chauffeur, Charles Tong. He was known for going to the Buffalo Club for lunch. The family attended church at Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. Eric attended Franklin School, Nichols School, and Hill School (a boarding school in Pottstown, PA). He then attended Yale University. Lars attended the Franklin School, Nichols School, and Hotchkiss (a boarding school in Lakeville, Connecticut). He then attended Princeton University. Brenda attended the Franklin School, the Park School, Buffalo Seminary, and the Westover Boarding School in Middlebury, Connecticut. She had a coming-out party at the Buffalo Country Club. Newspapers of the time stated that Brenda was the “prettiest girl of her debutante set.”  

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Front of 100 Getzville

As the children grew up and got married, they would live in the apartment in the Gate House building on the property. Brenda married William Boocock in June 1924. They moved into the Gate House when they were first married after Eric moved out. Shortly after, Brenda and William built their own house on the estate at 100 Getzville. The wood-shingled Colonial Revival house stood behind the stone wall. We called this house the Secret Garden House because of its impressive, rambling appearance and wooded grounds.  

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Rear of 100 Getzville

In 2012, the long-time owner of 100 Getzville passed away, and the house was sold. The new owner intended to have the property listed as a local historic landmark and renovate the home. However, they discovered more structural issues than they had anticipated, so they abandoned that idea. A demolition permit was issued on January 9, 2013. The house was demolished, which was distressing to many neighbors. The property has been divided into multiple lots with a single entrance to preserve the stone wall. A house was built, and a second house is currently under construction this summer.

Arthur continued to grow the E.L. Hedstrom Company. The company had five coal trestles in Buffalo, at the foot of Erie Street, at Chicago & Miami Streets, at North Main Street & the DL&W railroad, at Walden Avenue & the DL&W railroad, and at East & Parish Streets in Black Rock. In addition, the company maintained coal yards at Delaware Avenue & the DL&W, at Erie Street, at Walden Avenue, at Chicago Street, and in the Black Rock area. They also had a soft coal yard at Roseville and Van Rensselaer Streets.

In 1927, the company merged with Spaulding and Spaulding, another Buffalo coal company. The company was then known as the Hedstrom-Spaulding Company. In 1955, it merged with another coal company and became Spaulding-Yates.

In addition to his role at E.L. Hedstrom, Arthur served as President of the Fairmont Coal Company, the Duth Hill Mining Company, the Snyder Gas Company, the Cooper Paper Box Company, the Oak Ridge and Bostonia Railroad, and the Hedstrom Holding Company. Like his father, he was involved in the YMCA, serving as Director from 1900-1926 and on the Board of Trustees from 1920-1932. After WWI, he helped remodel the Pearl and Genesee Streets building that adjoined the YMCA into a hotel. The hotel went by several names, including the “Men’s Hotel” and the “Red Triangle Inn.” It served as inexpensive but good lodging for men and boys. In addition, he organized a campaign to build “The Girl’s Home” for similar purposes. He also rented a building and equipped it as a Social Center for African Americans. In 1928, he and a friend built a model apartment house for African Americans with families.

Arthur also served as sole trustee of the school in Snyder for 7 years. He was a life member of the Albright Art Gallery and the Buffalo Public Library. He also served as a member of the Electoral College to elect Teddy Roosevelt as President.

In 1913, Arthur helped organize the Buffalo Federation of Churches, a group of 48 churches from 11 denominations. He was the first President of this Organization. Arthur and Katherine helped organize Amherst Community Church, located near their estate on Washington Highway, built in 1916. Katherine was also active in civic and women’s affairs. She organized the Girl Scouts in Buffalo during WWI. She taught Sunday School and Delaware Baptist Church. She served on the Board of Directors of the YWCA for 17 years. She worked with the Women’s Suffrage Movement and the Joint Charities. Joint Charities formed during WWI to create synergy for fundraising for multiple organizations – Charity Organization Society, Children’s Aid Society and Society for the Prevention of Cruelties to Children, the District Nursing Association, and the Red Cross. Joint Charities is now the United Way of Buffalo & Erie County.

Katherine was also a prohibitionist. In 1931, she was one of 20 women who formed a national commission to present a report on prohibition and its enforcement from the women’s viewpoint. Mrs. Hedstrom wrote “Gains from Prohibition,” a report planned to be submitted to the President following their national conference.

Later in life, Arthur and Katherine liked to travel to get out of Buffalo in the winter. Arthur died in Vero Beach, Florida, in February 1946 at age 76. Two years later, the family sold the E.L. Hedstrom-Chicago Company. The family had still owned waterfront real estate, which they were able to sell for significant income. Katherine died in Buffalo in June 1952. After she died, the family sold their interests in the E.L. Hedstrom-Buffalo Company. The Hedstroms, along with many family members, are buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery.

The Hedstrom family sold the Four Winds property to Genrich Builders in 1947, who began to subdivide the property into development lots. Genrich Builder’s Snyder Development Co converted the Manor House and Gate House into apartments in 1949. Elmhurst Road was developed with housing lots first, and then High Court was built separating the Gate House and the Manor House.  

Genrich Builders and the Genrich Family were important in real estate in Amherst, starting with John Genrich entering the real estate business in 1919. He started Genrich Construction Company, which developed areas of the Lasalle neighborhood, including Lisbon, Highgate, and Minnesota Avenues. In the 1930s, the company formed Snyder Development Company to manage properties, such as the Hedstrom Manor House. John’s son, J. Harold Genrich, continued the business, changing the name to Genrich Builders in 1941. During the 1950s, the company began acquiring land in Amherst for both commercial and residential projects. Between 1919 and 1959, when John died, the company had built 2000 housing units. John’s other son, Willard Genrich, continued the family business as President of Genrich Builders Inc and the Lord Amherst Motor Hotel, which the family opened in 1962 at 5000 Main Street.

The Genrich family operated their business out of the family home at 4287 Main Street, not far from the Hedstrom Estate. The house had been initially built in 1880 by Charles Berryman. For those keeping track, 4287 Main Street is at the corner of Main Street and Berryman Drive, named for the Berryman family, who owned 40 acres between Main Street and the town line. In 2003, the more than 100-year-old farmhouse was purchased by the Amherst Industrial Development Agency (AIDA) and renovated into their offices.

The portion of the Hedstrom Estate that was not initially developed by Genrich Builders was developed in three phases in the 1950s as Pearce & Pearce’s “Getzville Estates.” Included in the Getzville Estates were Woodbury Drive, Meadowstream Drive, Greenbrier Drive, and Colony Court. Pearce & Pearce was founded by Howard and Early Pearce in 1936. Pent-up demand for housing from the Great Depression and WWII caused a housing boom by the 1950s. Residents were ready to leave behind the urban congestion for the suburban dream of a house of their own and a yard. As a result, Pearce & Pearce built more than 10,000 moderately priced homes for young families in Amherst. Houses in Getzville Estates were described as “charming contemporary homes, large fully landscaped lots, rambling 1-floor plan homes, all with three bedrooms, full basements, family rooms, attached 2-car garages, wood-burning fireplaces, and many other desirable modern features”. The homes were priced around $25,000 to $29,900. The house I grew up in is one of the Getzville Estates’ homes. All of the houses on our block were built as mirror images of their neighbors. Over the last 70 years, many (perhaps all?) homes have been modified and remodeled. Hence, every house is slightly different but has the same basic structural bones.

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Houses in Getzville Estates

The lots on Hedstrom, Berwin, Copper Heights, Koster Row, and Fairlawn were subdivided and developed as “Greater Boncroft,” named after another street in the area, Boncroft Drive.  

Starting in 1990, Benchmark Group developed 10 lots of residential houses in a new subdivision. The project was given the name “Four Winds” after the Hedstrom family estate and the nursery located on the site, and the road was named Four Winds Way. The completion of Four Winds Way completed the suburban development of the Four Winds Farm.

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Portion of the Stone Wall along Getzville Road in front of what was Brenda Hedstrom’s home

The Hedstrom Gate House and the stone wall along Main Street and Getzville Road are listed as Designated Historic Properties by the Town of Amherst Historic Preservation Commission (HPC). The rustic stone wall is from circa 1820 and is the oldest of the stone walls along Main Street in Snyder. Around 2001-2002 the Gatehouse Property was looking at redevelopment. Prospective buyers were interested in the property. One of them was the Amherst IDA, looking to purchase the property to renovate the Gate House, build a new building and a parking lot. In March of 2002, the Amherst Town Board voted to designate the entire 1.6 acre Gate House Site as a landmark. Initially, the Town was going to designate just the Gate House and a strip of land where the stone fence stands. However, residents fought to protect the entire site, including the grounds and grove of trees, which were important contextually for the building and wall. Caroline Duax, a local resident, led the fight, collected 787 signatures from area residents, and presented to Town Board. At the time, the property was still owned by Snyder Development Company, who fought the decision to landmark the site. They had been looking to sell the property to a developer. With the landmark protection, any developers needed the approval of the Historic Preservation Committee before making changes, making it less attractive for development. After the designation, the developer sued the Town.

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Hedstrom Gate House Source: Julianna Fiddler-Woite 

Caroline continued her research. She learned that Frederick Law Olmsted’s son landscaped the grounds in 1924 and went to Boston to get the blueprints from the Olmsted Conservancy. The drawings and blueprints can be found online in the Olmsted Archives here. She learned that the architect who designed the Manor House (and likely put the stucco on the Gate House) was Fred H Loverin, who also designed the Hotel Lennox on North Street in Buffalo.

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Item Number: 7292-4 Document Title: Mr. Arthur E. Hedstrom Williamsville Road Erie Co. N.Y. Cross-Section Elevations to Accompany Plan # 3 Scale 1/4″ = 1′ Project: 07292; Courtesy of the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site.

In 2006, Caroline and her husband ended up purchasing the property to preserve it. She served as the general contractor, designing and supervising the renovation over two years. While renovating, they discovered there were multiple structures within the 1904 shell that had been built by the Hedstroms. There was originally an older house structure at the west end (to the left in the above photo) along Main Street, dating from 1820. Hedstrom built the second house on the East end of the structure. The area between the two buildings was filled in with a one-story shed further back on the property and the archway seen from Main Street. They connected the buildings and covered them in stucco. Because of the archway, the property serves as the Gate House onto what was the Hedstrom Property.

Historically, there was a tollbooth located at Main and Getzville Road. Tollbooths were built by the Buffalo and Williamsville Macadam Company, which constructed Main Street as a toll road in 1836 to connect the two municipalities. The tollbooth at Getzville Road was the last tollbooth standing on Route 5 between Buffalo and Albany, operating until 1899. Some people think that the Gate House is the tollbooth, but that is not the case. There are some rumors that part of the tollbooth was used to construct the archway section of the Gate House, but I am not sure if they are founded. 

The house on the right (to the east) was occupied by the Hedstrom Estate Caretaker, Charles Tong, and his family. The house on the west was initially occupied by the farmers who worked on the farm and various Hedstrom family members over the years. The middle section housed farm and property equipment. The barn behind the East House is a large structure with a high peaked roof. The first floor held horses and buggies and later cars. East of the building, now the lawn and woods, was an apple and pear orchard. There is one pear tree and a few apple trees in the wooded area that still produce fruit.

In 2012, Caroline was awarded the Rehabilitation/Adaptive Reuse Award from Preservation Buffalo Niagara. Caroline Duax passed away in 2020 after a battle with cancer. Her husband planted 3000 daffodils to dance in the breeze each spring in her memory.

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Hedstrom Manor House Source: New York State Historic Preservation Office

Interestingly, the Manor House is not listed as a historic property, though in 2018, New York State Historic Preservation Office listed it as eligible for listing. Several older sources I found noted that the mansion had been demolished. This is likely because the wooded lot and setback make it hard to see from the street. The Tudor Revival and Craftsman house dates from around 1906 and is on a 3-acre lot. The house is two and a half stories built of quarry stone. The house included 14 master bedrooms and seven bathrooms. 

When the Manor House was converted into apartments, it was separated into eight two-bedroom apartments. Genrich preserved much of the park-like setting, including the spring-fed pond. In addition, the company developed housing lots on High Court and Elmurst Drive and several lots on Getzville.   

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View of the Pond from Elmhurst. Photo by Author

Historically, the property also included a pool, a pool house, pergola, and tennis courts, but those have been removed. In the early 2000s, 11 townhouses were proposed in six new buildings surrounding the Manor House. The neighbors fought against the development, but ultimately the plans were approved by the Town, and the townhouses were built. However, the developers did drop their plan to include a ring road around the townhouses, which would have significantly altered the scenic value of the remaining Hedstrom property.

Special thanks to Mitchell Hedstrom, Arthur’s Great Grandson, who wrote a book about his family history, an incredible resource for this researcher to find! If you’re interested in reading more about the Hedstroms, you can check out his book on Google Books here. And thank you for giving me permission to use some of your family photos. Thank you also to Caroline Duax for working so hard to save the Gate House. Your spirit was moving through me when I recently walked past the Gate House on a walk with my parent’s dog Lady, which finally convinced me I needed to write this post. And thank you to the Hedstroms for building their estate and for the Genriches and Pearces who constructed my neighborhood – it was a great place to grow up!

Want to learn about other streets? Check out the Street Index. Don’t forget to subscribe to the page to be notified when new posts are made. You can do so by entering your email address in the box on the upper right-hand side of the home page. You can also follow the blog on facebook. If you enjoy the blog, please be sure to share it with your friends.

Sources:

  • “Women Also Plan Prohibition Study:  Mrs. Arthur Hedstrom one of 20 Who Will Conduct National Conference”.  Buffalo Courier Express, March 19, 1931.
  • “A.E. Hedstrom, 76, President of Coal Company is Dead”.  Buffalo Evening News.  February 25, 1946, p6.
  • Borrelli, George and Kevin Collison.  “W.A. Genrich, Businessman, Regent, Dies”.  Buffalo News.  June 8, 1999.
  • Bridger, Chet.  “Amherst Development Agency Buys Home for Its Headquarters”.  Buffalo News.  July 19, 2003.
  • “Genrich Family Name Towers High in Growth of Area Building Industry”  Buffalo Courier Express January 7, 1979.  Sec G  p1
  • Radder, Joseph.  “Bill Pearce Succeeds Father & Grandfather in Family Business”.  Living Primetime.  Sept 2004.
  • “William Howard Pearce Dies; Developer and Philanthropist”.  Buffalo News.  November 22, 1998.
  • Thomas, G. Scott.  Turning Points #4:  Behind the Curb. Buffalo Business First.  June 19, 2014.
  • “Exclusive Subdivision Planned in Snyder”.  Buffalo News.  February 24, 1990.
  • Williams, Dierdre.  “Preservation Rules May Not Deter Gatehouse Buyers”.  Buffalo News.  June 5, 2002.
  • “Landmark Status Granted to Entire Hedstrom Site”.  Buffalo News.  March 5, 2002.
  • Duax, Caroline.  Letter to the Editor.  “Preserve Gate House and Its green Space”.  Buffalo News.  November 18, 2001.
  • McNeil, Harold.  “Amherst Residents Protest New Housing”.  Buffalo News.  August 16, 2002
  • McNeil, Harold. “Townhouse Developer to Present New Plans”.  Buffalo News.  November 20, 2002.
  • Silverman, Laura.  “Home:  Unlikely Champions Save Amherst Landmark”.  Buffalo Spree.  October 25, 2012.
  • Hedstrom, Mitchell.  Five Generations of Hedstroms:  An American Branch of a Swedish Family. iUniverse. 2020.  
  • Collins, Jimmy.  “Hedstrom Estate, Area Showplace, Bought by Genrich”.  Buffalo Evening News.  July 9, 1949. p7.
  • “Development is Planned”  Buffalo Courier-Express, February 21, 1960. B7.
  • “Heir Arrives in Boocok Household.”  Buffalo Courier.  May 31, 1925.  p49.
  • “Miss Hedstrom Radiantly Beautiful as a Bride”  Buffalo Courier.  June 15, 1924.  p45.
  • “Genrich Planning $500,000 Snyder Home Development”.  Buffalo Evening News.  February 20, 1960.  C-5.
  • “Genrich to Represent Mass. Firm”  Buffalo Courier Express.  November 19, 1978. H-2.
  • Town of Amherst. “Intensive Level Survey of Historic Resources”.   Bero Associates, Rochester NY.  August 1998.
  • Fiddler-Woite, Julianna. “The Gate House”.  Amherst 2000 Blog.  June 7, 2018.  amherst200.wordpress.com
  • Town of Amherst “Updated Reconnaissance Level Survey of Historic Resources”.  kta preservation specialists.  August 2011.

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